MAP-21 Find It, Fund It!

 

Our Find It, Fund It! Tool helps you find federal funding sources for 24 types of projects. Some of these sources you may know about. Some may be new to you. In every case, if your selected project is eligible then the tool will tell you how to fund it. Our Find It, Fund It! Tool centralizes and simplifies information about funding eligibility. It aims to connect people interested in getting infrastructure or other programs funded with all potential federal funding sources that can be utilized towards those interests.

MAP-21 consolidated several programs. For bicycling and walking projects, the primary consolidation was Transportation Enhancements, Safe Routes to School, and Recreational Trails being consolidated into the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP). Old programs were generally consolidated into these new programs:

  1. The Transportation Alternatives Program
  2. The National Highway Performance Program
  3. The Federal Lands Transportation Program
  4. The Tribal Transportation Program
  5. The State of Good Repair Grant Program

 

Note that although Safe Routes to School and Recreational Trails Program are listed under "not a continuing program", SRTS projects are still eligible under TAP and unless a state opts out, there is an RTP set-aside under TAP. You can also download the PDF version of the table.

Select a Project Below:

 

Recreational Trails Program (RTP)
Safe Routes to Schools (SRTS)
Scenic Byways (BYW)
Federal Lands Highway Program (FLH)
Transportation, Community and System Preservation (TCSP)
Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC)
Federal Transit Capital (FTA)
Transit Enhancements (FTA-TE)
 
 
Continuing program & eligibility
 
 
Funds available until expended, not a continuing distinct program under MAP-21
  • What it is: Transportation Alternatives Program (TA or TAP) provides funding for programs and projects defined as transportation alternatives; including on- and off-road pedestrian and bicycle facilities, recreational trail projects, safe routes to school projects, and other projects related to bicycle and pedestrian planning and facilities.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $808,760,000 was apportioned for TAP. In FY 2014, $819,900,000 was authorized for TAP. In FY 2013, $80,173,218 has been set-aside for the continuation of the Recreational Trails program from the total amount. Forty-eight states have opted-in to continuing the Recreational Trails program, with Florida and Kansas being the exceptions. The Federal share on TAP funded projects is generally 80%, with the state or other eligible local organization providing 20% of project funding. (http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/legsregs/directives/notices/n4510761/n4510761t2.htm)
  • Who to talk to: Funds are allocated to three places – 50% of TAP funds are sub-allocated to areas based on population, 50% of TAP funds remain with the state to be used anywhere, and in states that opt to retain their recreational trails program the state may determine an amount to set aside for that program before the sub-allocation described above takes place. TAP funds can be received by local governments, regional transportation authorities, transit agencies, natural resource or public land agencies, school districts, local education agencies, or schools, tribal governments and other local or regional governmental entities with responsibility for oversight of transportation or recreational trails that are determined to be eligible by a State. Non-profits may partner with any eligible entity, listed above, if permitted to do so by state or local requirements, but non-profits cannot directly receive TAP funds.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21, but it can be viewed as a consolidation of the Recreational Trails, Safe Routes to School, and Transportation Enhancement Programs. There may still be funds available for those programs, which have yet to be obligated to specific projects, in addition to the funds available through the TA program. Overall, according to data available from the FHWA’s Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS), between 2008 and 2012, 39.2% of the $3,722,744,638 in funds from those three prior programs was spent on bicycling and pedestrian projects.
  • Learn more: Advocacy Advance TAP Funding Flow Chart (http://www.advocacyadvance.org/site_images/content/map_21_infographic.pdf), Transportation Alternatives Toolkit and one pagers (http://www.advocacyadvance.org/MAP21)
  • What it is: The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program funds transportation projects to improve air quality and reduce traffic congestion in areas that do not meet air quality standards.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $2,302,131,638 in CMAQ funds was apportioned to the states. CMAQ typically covers 80 percent of the project cost, with the remaining 20 percent coming from the state, MPO or public/private partners.
  • Who to talk to: Funds are apportioned to states and then may be disbursed directly through their Departments of Transportation or suballocated to Metropolitan Planning Organizations. All CMAQ projects must be part of a state’s transportation plan and region’s transportation spending plan, called the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Funds must be spent in regions that do not meet national air quality standards for ozone and carbon monoxide levels (“non-attainment” areas) or have recently become compliant (“maintenance” areas). If a state does not have these areas, CMAQ funds are treated as part of the Surface Transportation Program (STP) and can be used anywhere in the state.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: According to data available from the FHWA’s Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS), between 2008 and 2012, 8.3% of CMAQ funds were spent on bicycling and pedestrian projects.
  • Learn more: Advocacy Advance CMAQ Funding Flow Chart (http://www.advocacyadvance.org/site_images/content/CMAQ_flow_chart.pdf)  and CMAQ Report (http://www.advocacyadvance.org/docs/lab_cmaq.pdf)
  • What it is: The Surface Transportation Program (STP) is a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) program that provides flexible funding for a wide variety of projects on any federal-aid highway.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $10,212,921,425 in STP funds was apportioned to the states. After STP funds are apportioned; they are available for four years before they expire. STP projects are generally eligible for 80% federal funding with a 20% minimum of matching local funds. There are several ways that the federal share of funding can be increased for STP projects. (http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/federalaid/guide/guide_current.cfm#c78)
  • Who to talk to: States receive the STP apportionment, but 50% of the apportionment is sub-allocated to areas based on their relative share of the total State population.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: According to data available from the FHWA’s Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS), between 2008 and 2012, .9% of STP (non-TE) funds were spent on bicycling and pedestrian projects.
  • What it is: The National Highway Performance Program (NHPP) is a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) program that provides support for the condition and performance of the National Highway System. MAP-21 expanded the National Highway System to include approximately 220,000 miles of rural and urban roads serving major population centers, international border crossings, intermodal transportation facilities, and major travel destinations.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $22,203,518,597 in NHPP funds was apportioned to the states. After the NHPP funds are apportioned, they are available for four years before they expire. NHPP projects are generally eligible for 80% federal funding with a 20% minimum of matching local funds. There are several ways that the federal share of funding can be increased for NHPP projects.
  • Who to talk to: State Departments of Transportation, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and other governmental entities with transportation planning responsibilities. Projects must be identified in the STIP/TIP and be consistent with the Long-Range Statewide Transportation Plan and the Metropolitan Transportation Plan(s).
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21. It replaced the National Highway System program that existed under previous legislation. Based on the information that we have obtained from FHWA’s Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS), there were no funds spent from the NHS program on bicycle and pedestrian projects in FY 2012.
  • What it is: The Federal Lands Transportation Program (FTLP) is a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) program that aims to improve multi-modal access within federal lands.
  • How much money is out there: In both FY 2013 and 2014 $300 million will be allocated to Federal Land Management Agency Partners. FTLP projects are funded 100% by federal funds.
  • Who to talk to: Funds are allocated each October to FLMA partners as follows - $240 million to the National Parks Service, $30 million to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and $30 million is awarded by a competitive process between the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S Army Corps of Engineers
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21. In the past the National Parks Service has built separated facilities such as the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail for bicycles and pedestrians: http://www.sleepingbeardunes.com/ ).
  • What it is: The Tribal Transportation Program (TTP) is a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) program that aims to provide access to basic community services to enhance the quality of life in Indian country.
  • How much money is out there: In both FY 2013 and 2014 $450 million will be allocated to Tribes according to a statutory formula. TTP projects are funded 100% by federal funds.
  • Who to talk to: Funds are allocated to Tribes based upon a statutory formula based on tribal population, road mileage and average shares of past funding under the Indian Reservation Roads program.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21. It replaces the Indian Reservation Roads program. For an example of past federal involvement in tribal transportation see: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/tribal/tribalprgm/govts/colville.htm.
  • What it is: Statewide and metropolitan transportation planning processes are governed by Federal law and applicable state and local laws if Federal highway or transit funds are used for transportation investment. Planning programs are administered by the FHWA and FTA, which provide funding for multimodal transportation planning to support the long- and short-range planning processes required by federal law.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $318,300,917in Metropolitan Planning funds was apportioned to the states by the FHWA. An additional $60,798,412 has been apportioned to the states by the FTA. Federal share is 80% with a required 20% non-federal match.
  • Who to talk to: Funding is distributed to states. Much of the funding is then allocated to Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). For non-Metropolitan areas the state DOT may retain control of the funds.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: Our FMIS data does not show any substantial spending on bike/ped in the past, but some bike/ped master plans were likely funded at least in part from these sources.
  • What it is: The Urbanized Area (UZA) Formula Grant program provides grants for public transportation capital, planning, job access and reverse commute projects, as well as operating expenses in certain circumstances.
  • How much money is out there: In FY 2013, $2,290,545,383 has been apportioned to the UZA Grant program. More than $2 billion of this apportionment is to urbanized areas with a population of more than 200,000 and in those areas not less than 1% of funds must be spent on associated transit improvements, which includes many bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Federal share is 80% for capital assistance with a required 20% non-federal match.
  • Who to talk to: For urbanized areas with populations of more than 200,000 funds are given to a designated recipient with legal authority for that urbanized area, usually Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). For urbanized areas with populations under 200,000 funds are generally given to the state Governor.
  • What it is: Section 402, the State and Community Highway Safety Grant Program, is a federal program that provides funds for education, enforcement and research programs designed to reduce traffic crashes, deaths, injuries, and property damage.
  • How much money is out there: Funding for the 402 grant program is authorized at $235 million each year in FY 2013 and 2014 (http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/programs/402.html). States are allocated Section 402 funds using a formula which bases 75% of funding on the state’s population and 25% on total public road miles; however, all states are entitled to no less than one half of one percent of total Section 402 funds.
  • Who to talk to: In each State, funds are administered by the Governor's Representative for Highway Safety. States are required to submit their Section 402 grant application by July 1 of each fiscal year.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: In FY 2008, according to http://www.advocacyadvance.org/docs/section_402.pdf, 2.67% of 402 grant funds were spent on bicycle and pedestrian programs. In FY 2009, 2.46% was spent.
  • Learn more: Advocacy Advance Section 402 Report (http://www.advocacyadvance.org/docs/section_402.pdf)
  • What it is: The State of Good Repair Program is a new formula-based program administered by the FTA dedicated to repairing and upgrading the nation’s rail transit systems and bus rapid transit.
  • How much money is out there: $2,136.3 million in FY 2013 and $2,165.9 million in FY 2014. Federal share is 80% with a required 20% match.
  • Who to talk to: State and local governments, public agencies, and private non-profit organizations responsible for public transportation.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21. Its eligibilities are most similar to the Bus and Bus Facilities program.
  • Learn more: FTA State of Good Repair Grants Fact Sheet (http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/MAP-21_Fact_Sheet_-_State_of_Good_Repair_Grants.pdf).
  • What it is: The Bus and Bus Facilities Program provides capital funding to replace, rehabilitate and purchase buses, related equipment, and related facilities.
  • How much money is out there: Funding for the Bus and Bus Facilities program is authorized at $422 million in FY 2013 and $427.8 million in FY 2014. Federal share is 80% with a required 20% local match. (but see apportionment info: http://www.fta.dot.gov/12308_14875.html)
  • Who to talk to: State and local governments, public agencies, and private non-profit organizations engaged in public transportation.
  • How much has been spent on bike/ped in the past: This is a new program under MAP-21. It replaces a previous Bus and Bus Facilities Program, which was historically allocated by earmark. At times those earmarks included bicycling and pedestrian facilities. An example is the construction of a vehicle and bicycle parking lot and pedestrian rest area at a transit center in Baldwin Park, CA that was earmarked in 2006 for $384,560.
  • What it is: The Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities program (5310) provides funding to States for the purpose of assisting private non-profit groups in meeting the transportation needs of the elderly and persons with disabilities.
  • How much money is out there: Funding for the 5310 program is authorizes at $255 million in FY 2013. Funds are distributed by formula to the states based on each state’s share of the elderly population. The Federal share can be no more than 80% and the local share of project costs must be at least 20%. (but see apportionment info: http://www.fta.dot.gov/12308_14875.html)
  • Who to talk to: Funds are allocated to state Governors and MPOs for urbanized areas with populations of 200,000 or more. Other state and local government authorities, private non-profit organizations, and operators of public transportation may receive grants through either of those entities.
  • What it is: The Formula Grant for Rural Areas (5311) program provides capital, planning and operating assistance to state to support public transportation in rural areas with populations of less than 50,000.
  • How much money is out there: MAP-21 provides $559.5 million in FY 2013 for the 5311 program and $607.8 million in FY 2014. Eligible bicycle facilities funded under this program can have a federal share of up to 90%, with local entities covering as little as 10% of project costs. (but see apportionment info: http://www.fta.dot.gov/12308_14875.html)
  • Who to talk to: Funds are distributed to States and Indian Tribes. State and local government authorities, non-profit organizations, operators of public transportation and intercity bus services may receive funds indirectly through either of those entities.
A Partnership of:
Alliance for Biking & WalkingLeague of American Bicyclists

Supported by:
SRAM

EveryBody Walk
Stay Updated:

We are revamping our communications in the coming months, and would love to keep you better connected with our work.

To sign up for our future newsletters, please fill out this short survey with your subscription preferences.